What will be the impact of Brexit’s outcome for the food Industry?

Question

What will be the impact of Brexit’s outcome for the food Industry?

This questions was asked as part of our webinar on ‘What exporters need to know about Brexit in 2017’. You can find a recording of the webinar here:

http://opentoexport.com/webinars/what-exporters-need-to-know-about-brexit-in-2017/

Answer

Hi, As was discussed in the webinar, it is really too early to give any hard information about the future, as this will depend on the outcome of the exit negotiations. I presume that you are asking the question from the perspective of an exporter, rather than an importer?

Following the P.M.’s recent speech it does look increasingly likely that the UK’s future will lie outside the EU single market, so there is a good chance that UK exports to EU countries will be treated by EU customs officials and importers in the same way as imports from other non-EU countries. They are likely to have to go though a customs clearance process, they may be subject to import duties, (unless any agreement can be reached that exempts us fom that). In addition, UK food producers may need to supply documentation or certificates, to prove that UK products meet EU food & veterinary standards. The specific requirements will depend on the actual product.

One way to check out what the possible “worst case” scenario might be, is to go to the import section of the EU Market Access database, at: http://madb.europa.eu/madb/euTariffs.htm Once there, inset the first 4 or six digits of the customs tariff code which applies for your product, and select as the country of origin the USA (you cannot currently choose UK). This will take you to a list of EU tariff codes & import duties which could apply for imports from the UK in the future. You may also see reference to documentary or regulatory requirements, such as veterinary control. You may also see a seies of letters & digits, (possibly starting with CD) – if you click on these, it will bring up more detail on those documentary requirements.

Answer

Hi, As was discussed in the webinar, it is really too early to give any hard information about the future, as this will depend on the outcome of the exit negotiations. I presume that you are asking the question from the perspective of an exporter, rather than an importer?

Following the P.M.’s recent speech it does look increasingly likely that the UK’s future will lie outside the EU single market, so there is a good chance that UK exports to EU countries will be treated by EU customs officials and importers in the same way as imports from other non-EU countries. They are likely to have to go though a customs clearance process, they may be subject to import duties, (unless any agreement can be reached that exempts us fom that). In addition, UK food producers may need to supply documentation or certificates, to prove that UK products meet EU food & veterinary standards. The specific requirements will depend on the actual product.

One way to check out what the possible “worst case” scenario might be, is to go to the import section of the EU Market Access database, at: http://madb.europa.eu/madb/euTariffs.htm Once there, inset the first 4 or six digits of the customs tariff code which applies for your product, and select as the country of origin the USA (you cannot currently choose UK). This will take you to a list of EU tariff codes & import duties which could apply for imports from the UK in the future. You may also see reference to documentary or regulatory requirements, such as veterinary control. You may also see a seies of letters & digits, (possibly starting with CD) – if you click on these, it will bring up more detail on those documentary requirements.

Answer

Hi, As was discussed in the webinar, it is really too early to give any hard information about the future, as this will depend on the outcome of the exit negotiations. I presume that you are asking the question from the perspective of an exporter, rather than an importer?

Following the P.M.’s recent speech it does look increasingly likely that the UK’s future will lie outside the EU single market, so there is a good chance that UK exports to EU countries will be treated by EU customs officials and importers in the same way as imports from other non-EU countries. They are likely to have to go though a customs clearance process, they may be subject to import duties, (unless any agreement can be reached that exempts us fom that). In addition, UK food producers may need to supply documentation or certificates, to prove that UK products meet EU food & veterinary standards. The specific requirements will depend on the actual product.

One way to check out what the possible “worst case” scenario might be, is to go to the import section of the EU Market Access database, at: http://madb.europa.eu/madb/euTariffs.htm Once there, inset the first 4 or six digits of the customs tariff code which applies for your product, and select as the country of origin the USA (you cannot currently choose UK). This will take you to a list of EU tariff codes & import duties which could apply for imports from the UK in the future. You may also see reference to documentary or regulatory requirements, such as veterinary control. You may also see a seies of letters & digits, (possibly starting with CD) – if you click on these, it will bring up more detail on those documentary requirements.

Menu
Export Action Plan