How will the Northern/Republic of Ireland border work?

Question

Can we discuss the possible border issues in Ireland between North and South – how is this intended to work?

This questions was asked as part of our webinar on ‘What exporters need to know about Brexit in 2017’. You can find a recording of the webinar here:

http://opentoexport.com/webinars/what-exporters-need-to-know-about-brexit-in-2017/

Answer

This is likely to be one of the most complex issues in any exit settlement, and it is very difficult to give any clear idea.

On the one hand, it is quite likely that some form of customs clearance process may be required to transport goods across the border in either direction – this may or may not require physical stops and controls of goods and payment of duty. On the othe hand, the PM did reiterate in her speech of 17th January her determination to maintain an “open Border” arrangement to permit easy border crossing & freedom of movement by individuals.

There are parallels elsewhere in Europe, such as in the borders between non-EU Norway and Sweden & Finland. These are set up to allow free transit by private individuals, but to maintain oversight and allow the customs process to take place for freight, either at the border or remotely. These solutions use features such as CCTV cameras to monitor flows, and “shared border posts”, one physical transit point overseen jointly both countries.

In some respects the solution is helped by the fact that neither country is in the Schengen agreement, so movement into the island of Ireland is restricted; on the other hand, security collaboration is necessary, and measures will also have to be put into place to pevent fraud.

Answer

This is likely to be one of the most complex issues in any exit settlement, and it is very difficult to give any clear idea.

On the one hand, it is quite likely that some form of customs clearance process may be required to transport goods across the border in either direction – this may or may not require physical stops and controls of goods and payment of duty. On the othe hand, the PM did reiterate in her speech of 17th January her determination to maintain an “open Border” arrangement to permit easy border crossing & freedom of movement by individuals.

There are parallels elsewhere in Europe, such as in the borders between non-EU Norway and Sweden & Finland. These are set up to allow free transit by private individuals, but to maintain oversight and allow the customs process to take place for freight, either at the border or remotely. These solutions use features such as CCTV cameras to monitor flows, and “shared border posts”, one physical transit point overseen jointly both countries.

In some respects the solution is helped by the fact that neither country is in the Schengen agreement, so movement into the island of Ireland is restricted; on the other hand, security collaboration is necessary, and measures will also have to be put into place to pevent fraud.

Answer

This is likely to be one of the most complex issues in any exit settlement, and it is very difficult to give any clear idea.

On the one hand, it is quite likely that some form of customs clearance process may be required to transport goods across the border in either direction – this may or may not require physical stops and controls of goods and payment of duty. On the othe hand, the PM did reiterate in her speech of 17th January her determination to maintain an “open Border” arrangement to permit easy border crossing & freedom of movement by individuals.

There are parallels elsewhere in Europe, such as in the borders between non-EU Norway and Sweden & Finland. These are set up to allow free transit by private individuals, but to maintain oversight and allow the customs process to take place for freight, either at the border or remotely. These solutions use features such as CCTV cameras to monitor flows, and “shared border posts”, one physical transit point overseen jointly both countries.

In some respects the solution is helped by the fact that neither country is in the Schengen agreement, so movement into the island of Ireland is restricted; on the other hand, security collaboration is necessary, and measures will also have to be put into place to pevent fraud.

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