What would be the rough costings to consider in exporting solar PV products from the UK to Nigeria?

Question posted by Matt Cawley, on behalf of Decarbonated Consultancy in SN14

We are a small environmental consultancy with a unique set of stakeholders and suppliers. A contact has approached us in Nigeria and is interested in importing solar PV product form the UK for a number of interested, large domestic projects. We are not experts in this field, and are currently in the scoping phase of the idea. However, we would very much appreciated all known associated costs and key barriers to this proposal, and any supporting information that is available.

Kind Regards
Matt ( Decarbonated Consultancy)

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HI Matt, one thing you will need to consider is that exports to Nigeria are regulated by SONCAP, the Standards Organisation of Nigeria Conformity Assessment Programme.

SONCAP verifies the conformity of all products exported to Nigeria except those that appear on the Excluded Product List and enforces their standards. Compliance to SONCAP requirements is applicable in addition to any existing import processes and is mandatory in order to get the necessary Certificate of Conformity for Customs clearance.

The CoC has to be issued by a SON Approved Inspection Body of which Intertek is the longest serving, if your products are regulated they will also require an inspection.

You can get more details on the programme from http://www.intertek.com/government/product-conformity/exports/nigeria/ alternatively you can contact my colleague Estelle Mann our SONCAP UK Coordinator on Tel: +44 (0) 1908 857815 or email her at estelle.mann@intertek.com.

I hope this helps.

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Sally Barlass, on behalf of Transvalair Group in Gatwick.

Hi There Matt,

Thanks for asking the question and I hope you are well.
We would love to help you with this project! Please can you advise of weights, dimensions and a collection point, we can provide you with all the information you require.
Lastly, would you like this to be transported by air or sea freight?

Many Thanks and Kind Regards
Sally @ Transvalair
sally@transvalair.com

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Darren Playfoot, on behalf of ROCHARD SHIPPING LTD in KT15.

Dear Matt,
There are a number of factors / costs to consider when dealing with exports to Nigeria, there would be banking costs, as I assume sale would be under terms of a letter of credit, terms of sale, shipping costs, depending on size and weights of items, cost effective in 20' or 40' containers. As mentioned above, shipments to Nigeria are subject to SONCAP, requirements, I believe have recently changed, and shipments would now require a pre-shipment inspection at time of loading, and samples would possibly need to be tested prior to shipment to adhere to SONCAP regulations, I would be happy to advise /assist and quote you for shipping, arranging testing and liasing with the inspection agencies, etcs. Please email me directly on dplayfoot@rochardshipping.co.uk, or call on 01932 565225 if I can be of futher assistance.
Trust in order
Best regards
Darren

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Nitin Datta, on behalf of Kobalt Notaries Limited in SW10.

Hi Matt

The exports to Nigeria are regulated by SONCAP. However there are many other factors when you are considering exports to Nigeria.

First of all you will need to have a letter of credit to be verified in Nigeria. If your buyer is paying in first then its not needed. But usually it is a twin procedure in West African countries about the delivery and acceptance of goods. The Letter of Credit is not verified until the regulations are not satisfied.

Some agencies are importing Solar products in Nigeria without paying the Import duty in Nigeria as it comes under the Environmental projects.However your buyer will need to register under that program himself.

If you need any further guidance pertaining to this matter , please feel free to contact us.

Regards
Nitin Datta

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David Eales, on behalf of Excel Shipping Limited in Hornchurch.

Hi Matt

Further to the other comments above you will also need to consider if the buyer in Nigeria has made Form m arrangements and if they have a Form M number, This will be needed in order
to clear the goods on arrival but is not necessary for us to arrange the shipping.

Feel free to contact me with full details of your order if you need prices from as as not only can we offer FCL prices we also run a part load service on fortnightly service from UK.

Kind regards
Dave Eales e mail davide@excelshipping.com
Excel Shipping Limited
Tel 01708 515151
www.excelshipping.com

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Molly Jones, on behalf of Light By Solar Global in Bedfordshire.

Exporting to Nigeria is not a complex matter.

Due to risk factors letters of credit are not normally advanced to anyone by most companies until a B2B arrangement is firmly established or if it is a government parastatal .

To export to Nigeria where you are selling directly to a distributor, or importer, they will already have a variety of different elements in place to clear their own goods.

I ship to this country regularly, I never get involved in good clearance. I ship FOB and that is most practical buyer pays the stipulated shipping, organises their own shipping and clears their own goods.

This is because I am not physically on ground and it is impractical to attempt to remotely facilitate this process

With regard to busines terms you should ordinarily obtain a minimum of 30% up to 70% to accept fulfilment of order and 100 % of your goods costs should be obtained before you let your goods out of your sight.

A fair number of responses are citing shipping capability and advise on shippment, but I assume you just want to know what to do practically.

So again the rules are

1. No payment, no shippment unless credit lines are earned and be wary of credit line agencies who will gain credibilty and then default on larger shippings

2. no less than 45% must be recieved before production

3. Do not accept any cheques or banking drafts use Bank transfers only

4. Do not get completely strung into 'helping' the recipient to clear goods, it is rare to do CIF to Nigeria. Just sell FOB

5. If you decide to set up warehousing there, then take a month out go there and set your instruments in place.

Hire a car and driver for the duration, book into an apartolodge and take all your credentials with you ideally to Abuja.

Seek collaborations or technical liasons where possible to fulfil your aims.

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Molly Jones, on behalf of Light By Solar Global in Bedfordshire.

Exporting to Nigeria is not a complex matter.

Due to risk factors letters of credit are not normally advanced to anyone by most companies until a B2B arrangement is firmly established or if it is a government parastatal .

To export to Nigeria where you are selling directly to a distributor, or importer, they will already have a variety of different elements in place to clear their own goods.

I ship to this country regularly, I never get involved in good clearance. I ship FOB and that is most practical buyer pays the stipulated shipping, organises their own shipping and clears their own goods.

This is because I am not physically on ground and it is impractical to attempt to remotely facilitate this process

With regard to busines terms you should ordinarily obtain a minimum of 30% up to 70% to accept fulfilment of order and 100 % of your goods costs should be obtained before you let your goods out of your sight.

A fair number of responses are citing shipping capability and advise on shippment, but I assume you just want to know what to do practically.

So again the rules are

1. No payment, no shippment unless credit lines are earned and be wary of credit line agencies who will gain credibilty and then default on larger shippings

2. no less than 45% must be recieved before production

3. Do not accept any cheques or banking drafts use Bank transfers only

4. Do not get completely strung into 'helping' the recipient to clear goods, it is rare to do CIF to Nigeria. Just sell FOB

5. If you decide to set up warehousing there, then take a month out go there and set your instruments in place.

Hire a car and driver for the duration, book into an apartolodge and take all your credentials with you ideally to Abuja.

Seek collaborations or technical liasons where possible to fulfil your aims.

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